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“Did I Do That?” 2nd Annual Social Media Awards: # 3, DiGiorno’s

Domestic violence has made its way to the forefront of the American psyche over the past few months. Incidents like NFL player, Ray Rice, knocking out his girlfriend in an elevator and the supposed coverup that ensued, have garnered an enormous amount of attention and resulted in a seemingly renewed cultural awareness of the issue. Why the public had to be galvanized by the media is another question entirely.

Anyway, domestic violence is obviously a very sensitive issue. One that affects millions of men and women worldwide in the most horrific of ways. There are hundreds of organizations and support groups to help those that face it. The support has even made its way to social media – specifically Twitter – where victims share their stories using hashtags with others who will understand plight and can hopefully find the help they need to remove themselves from their situations.

One such way victims of abuse can engage with one another is through the hashtag #WhyIStayed. This #, which was trending heavily around the time of the Ray Rice fiasco, allows victims to share their heartbreaking stories of desperation.

On September 8th, after Ray Rice had been terminated by the Baltimore Ravens for the altercation with this wife, and just days before we found out just how grizzly and callous the crime was, DiGiorno’s had a fail of Epic proportions when they decided to tie into the #WhyIStayed hastag before knowing why it was trending. The “Oh S*$T!” moment they must have had as comments like the one below started to come in was one for the ages, I’m sure.

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DiGiorno’s quickly issued the following apology:

digiorno-whyistayed-tweet-hed-2014The apology is almost as offensive as the original post. This is a blatant example of carelessness – a brand shamelessly hijacking a trending topic to get attention without an iota of strategy. Yes, social moves fast, and it’s hard to plan for sometimes, but at least take a few seconds to think it through before posting something.

Hijacking a hashtag with nothing more than a knee-jerk reaction and lust for attention never goes well – *ahem Entenmanns. It’s a bit baffling to me, all the time, detail and effort that goes into building a brand, and then someone says, “Hey. let’s just jump on this social thing. Everyone’s doing it.” If you are going to do it, do it with care.

Better luck next year.

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“Did I Do That?” 2nd Annual Social Media Awards: #4, Volvo

The loss of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 was one of the worst flight disasters in recent memory. Not because of how many lives were taken, or the way in which it was lost, but because it was just that – lost. We still don’t have the answers to explained what happened to the 239 people who were on board the airplane that day.

Shortly after the flight went missing, automaker Volvo learned entered itself into the realm of the absurd when they posted the following post to micro blogging service Sina Weibo – China’s version of Twitter:

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“The rescue operation for the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane is in full swing. Passenger safety is also a top priority at Volvo Cars, let’s pray together for the 239 lives that were on board of the plane. Bless them, and may a miracle occur.”

Wow.. Just WOW!

Hopefully this post was made by one terribly misguided soul, because the thought that more than one person actually approved this is all the more horrifying. This is PR 101, people: never use a tragedy to promote a product! It might not even be in the textbook – it’s so obvious and commonsensical that if you thought otherwise you should never, ever, try your hand at anything resembling public relations.

Volvo quickly blamed the faux paux on an international agency before issuing the following statement:

“Volvo Car Group would like to apologies for the offense caused by a recent online statement that mentioned the tragic disappearance of flight MH370,” it said. “That statement did not properly reflect the deep concern that all our employees feel as the search for the missing plane continues. Our thoughts are with the families of those involved.”

I think it’s safe to say that the agency responsible for this no longer has Volvo on their roster. Here’s to a more prosperous 2015!

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“Did I Do That?” 2nd Annual Social Media Awards: #5, American Apparel

American Apparel is no stranger to controversy. Their ads have been knocked for years for bordering on the edge of pornography, and most recently, the company voted to oust chairman and CEO Dov Charney after a long tenure of misconduct, including refusing to participate in mandatory sexual harassment training and using severance packages to quiet former employees.

You’d think that AA would have it’s antennas on full alert these days in order to avoid any additional negative press, right? Well maybe they did – everyone except for one unfortunate “international social media” employee that is – who posted the following picture to the American Apparel Tumblr account back in July:

AA Fail

AA Fail

Apparently the post, which was the tagged “#Smoke” and “#Clouds”, was supposed to represent fireworks for the 4th of July Holiday. Unfortunately, the employee passed over the millions of stock images of fireworks for a photo that shows the Jan. 28, 1986 explosion of the Challenger shuttle, which killed all seven people aboard.

One astute commenter corrected the cringe-worthy post rather bluntly:

AA comment

American Apparel was quick to respond to the onslaught that ensued, flattening their probably long gone social employee under the bus without hesitation:

“The image was re-blogged in error by one of our international social media employees who was born after the tragedy and was unaware of the event,” American Apparel posted. “We sincerely regret the insensitivity of that selection and the post has been deleted.”

The Challenger disaster was one many will never forget. Hopefully AA doesn’t forget this brain lapse either and has a better 2015. But really, how about owning up to the mistake as a brand, guys? SMH.

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